Everything about Microspheres
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  • Motivations for Using Biodegradable Microspheres in Drug Delivery

    In recent years there is significant interest in using biodegradable polymeric microspheres for drug delivery. Delivering drugs through biodegradable microspheres has numerous advantages compared to conventional delivery systems. While in conventional systems the drug is usually released shortly after delivery and stops working after a brief period of time, biodegradable polymer offers a way to provide sustained release over a longer time, thus eliminating the need for multiple doses and ensuring sustained and controlled drug delivery over weeks or months. Continue reading “Motivations for Using Biodegradable Microspheres in Drug Delivery” »

  • Porous Ceramics: Application for Polyethylene Microspheres

    Background:

    Usually porous ceramics are made from aluminum oxide, silicon carbide or Zirconia.  Most porous ceramics have a natural ability to fill pores by capillary action. This makes porous ceramics water accepting, thus they also are referred to as hydrophilic material. This means the pores and channels of a ceramic have a highly charged pore surface that attracts and bonds the polar molecules of water and other polar fluids. The net effect is called “wicking” — the ability to pull fluids into the material and transport that fluid by capillary forces.  The pore size directly affects the ceramic’s air entry or bubbling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. The effective pore size is determined by the minimum orifice within a channel or pore.1

    Some porous ceramic have 40-50% open porosity with a tortuous pore structure and is available in pore sizes ranging from 0.25 to 90 microns. Monolithic, single grade, aluminum oxide porous ceramic is available in 6, 15, 30, 50, 60 and 90 micron pore sizes. In addition, some ceramic membranes can use a medium pore substrate with a thin coating of fine porous ceramic membrane in 0.25, 1, 3 and 6 micron pore sizes.2 Continue reading “Porous Ceramics: Application for Polyethylene Microspheres” »

  • Dual nanocomposite multihollow polymer microspheres prepared by suspension polymerization based on a multiple pickering emulsion

    Excerpts from an interesting approach to creating hollow polymer microspheres from a pickering emulsion.

    Abstract:

    A solid-stabilized multiple w/o/w or o/w/o emulsion was prepared in a two-step process. Various nanocomposite polymer microspheres with multihollow armored closed pores were fabricated easily by suspension polymerization of the multiple Pickering stabilized emulsions.

    Continue reading “Dual nanocomposite multihollow polymer microspheres prepared by suspension polymerization based on a multiple pickering emulsion” »

  • Measurement Techniques for Electrostatic Charged Microspheres

    Charged Microspheres Measurement TechniquesElectrostatic charge (also known as triboelectric charge) on microparticles and microspheres have been of interest to scientists in chemical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, drug delivery, displays and other industries for many years. Until recently there were no reliable techniques to measure or quantify electrostatic charge on microparticles, with too many uncontrolled variables the measurements were inconsistent. As a result scientists were treating charging as a black box process, performing the experiments blindly as trial and error. With recent advances in microsphere manufacturing, techniques have been developed that promise not only to quantify the charge on microspheres, but control it in the manufacturing process.

    Continue reading “Measurement Techniques for Electrostatic Charged Microspheres” »

  • Electrostatic-based DNA Microarray Offers Medical Diagnostics Capabilities

    The uses for microspheres continue to grow, a recent article published by UC-Berkley shows how DNA sequencing can be achieved through the use of statically charged microspheres.   The key breakthrough is that they have been able to achieve a visible result through using the electrostatic repulsion of the microspheres.   A copy of their announcement follows:

    Groves,  and members of his research group Nathan Clack and Khalid Salaita, have published a paper on their technique in the journal Nature Biotechnology, which is now available online. The paper is entitled “Electrostatic readout of DNA microarrays with charged microspheres.Continue reading “Electrostatic-based DNA Microarray Offers Medical Diagnostics Capabilities” »