Everything about Microspheres
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  • Fluorescent Microspheres Used for Experiments in Plant Canopies

    Fluorescent Microspheres - Polymer Spheres - 1g/cc

    Fluorescent Microspheres – Polymer Spheres – 1g/cc

    The University of Utah in collaboration with USDA Labs in Corvallis, OR performed five field campaigns in commercial vineyards in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.  Among the methodologies developed over the five-years experiment was the use of fluorescent microsheres as a fungal spore analog.  The microspheres used were inert fluorescing polyethylene micropsheres in four separate colors manufactured by Cospheric.

    The article attached below outlines the technology developed as well as microspheres sampling and meteorological equipment used in the experiments.  The authors of the article conclude that “these techniques have enabled for incredibly detailed research into particle plume dynamics in a vineyard.”

    NMiller_Poster_Methods

     

     

  • Microspheres Used as a Drug Delivery System

    There has been numerous studies done and articles published in scientific publications about the advantages of microspheres as a drug delivery system vs conventional approach to drug delivery.  Design, Development and Future Application of Microspheres by Divya Rawat , U.K> Singh and Faizi Muzaffar,  Kharvel Subharti College of Pharmacy, published in PharmaTutor discusses the types of microspheres that posses the properties needed for various drug delivery systems, their advantages and limitations.  The micropsheres best suitable to be used in biomedical applications, research and lab experiments are polystyrene.  According to the article: “Polystyrene microspheres are typically used in biomedical applications due to their ability to facilitate procedures such as cell sorting and immune precipitation. Proteins and ligands adsorb onto polystyrene readily and permanently, which makes polystyrene microspheres suitable for medical research and biological laboratory experiments. Polyethylene microspheres are commonly used as permanent or temporary filler. Lower melting temperature enables polyethylene microspheres to create porous structures in ceramics and other materials. High sphericity of polyethylene microspheres, as well as availability of colored and fluorescent microspheres, makes them highly desirable for flow visualization and fluid flow analysis, microscopy techniques, health sciences, process troubleshooting and numerous research applications.”

    Another research paper that discusses advantages and disadvantages of microspheres use for drug delivery, as well as techniques to prepare microsheres and principle behind drug delivery system is Microspheres as Drug Carriers for Controlled Drug Delivery: a Review by Nisha Sharma, Neha Purwar and Prakash Chandra Gupta, University Institute of Pharmacy, C.S.J.M. University, Kanpur, India published in International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research.  Polymer microspheres were used for the experiment. The authors conclude that “microspheres are better choice of drug delivery system than many other types of drug delivery system. In future by combining various other strategies, microspheres will find the central and significant place in novel drug delivery, particularly in diseased cell sorting, diagnostics, gene & genetic materials, safe, targeted, specific and effective in-vitro delivery and supplements as miniature version of diseased organ and tissues in the body.”

  • Enabling Breakthroughs with Precision Microspheres

    Yelena Lipovetskaya, the CEO and co-founder of Cospheric LLC, the leading global supplier of precision spherical particles, was recently interviewed on 805conversations podcast which features engaging talks with leaders and thinkers in the 805 region in California. In this podcast, Yelena talks about the company, the foundations, and the path forward. Yelena answers a lot of challenging and informative questions on what is a microsphere, what are the applications and numerous fields of science and technology they are used in, and how precision microspheres enable breakthroughs in so many ways.

  • 12th International Symposium on Particle Image Velcoimetry

    Particle Image Velocimetry and Seeding Particles

    I recently attended the 12th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry in Busan, Korea on behalf of Cospheric, a company that specializes in precision microspheres. With the hope of learning more about seeding particles involved in PIV research and what advancements in microsphere technology would benefit the work being done in flow visualization. Through conversations with many attendees I was able to gather information on some of the important factors involved in tracer particle and their ideal capabilities. An interesting addition to seeding particles brought up by several individuals was temperature sensitive spheres which could potentially provide temperature field information.

    Below is an example of neutrally buoyant microspheres which are used as flow tracers in PIV applications.

    Fluorescent Red Polyethylene Microspheres

    The venue, Haeundae Grand Hotel, was spectacular with multiple large halls available for the over 200 presentations. The surrounding city was a maze of markets and skyscrapers nestled between the mountains and coast. Wonderful weather graced us, even rivaling that of Santa Barbara. Which was not something I had considered possible. I had the pleasure and displeasure of trying many unique foods. With bibimbap from a shop near the beach and shrimp dumplings from a small business steeped in the steam used to cook their dumplings being definite highlights. While the eel which I am still unsure whether was cooked or not falling on the other side of the spectrum. I am still processing the wealth of information from ISPIV 2017 and will express my conclusions as it manages to leak from my head.

  • Glass Microspheres Used in Studying Self-Cleaning Gecko-Inspired Adhesives

    Image of Self-cleaning Adhesive of Gecko's Toes

    Image of Self-cleaning Adhesive of Gecko's Toes Source: wikipedia.com

    Researchers from Carnegie Melon University and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have recently published an article in Journal of the Royal Society titled Staying Sticky: Contact Self-Cleaning of Gecko-Inspired Adhesives that presents the first gecko-inspired adhesive that matches both the attachment and self-cleaning properties of gecko’s foot on a smooth surface.

    Using glass microspheres to simulate contamination the scientists created a synthetic gecko adhesive that could self-clean and recover lost adhesion. Real world applications of self-cleaning adhesives are reusable adhesive tapes, clothing, medical adhesives (bandages) and pick-and-place robots, among others.

    Everyday challenge with traditional adhesives is that they loose their stickiness once contaminated. Geckos have been intriguing researchers for decades because of their unique and striking capability to maintain the stickiness of their toes through contact self-cleaning. They can travel up the walls and ceilings in a wide variety of “dirty” settings retaining adhesion.

    Upon experimentation, scientists discovered that the critical variable is the relative size of microfibers that make up the adhesive compared to the diameter of contaminant particles. Glass microspheres were used in diameters from 3 to 215microns. Glass microspheres were packed in air and used as supplied. Contamination of the samples was achieved by brining each sample in contact with a monolayer of glass microspheres with specific speeds under predetermined compressive loads. The cleaning process involved a load-drag-unload procedure.

    Best self-cleaning results were obtained with the largest contaminants (glass microspheres), with the size of the adhesive fiber much smaller than the contaminating particle. This information is important to know when designing self-cleaning adhesives—make the adhesive fibers much smaller for improved adhesion recovery. This cleaning mechanism requires unloading particles by dragging. The other extreme of contaminating microspheres being much smaller than the adhesive fibers has advantages in some situations, even though it works by a different mechanism. Smaller microspheres tended to become embedded into the adhesive material. Particle embedding is a temporary cleaning process but might be sufficient in some applications.